Monday, January 6, 2014

Comparison Study - "Anectadotal Analysis )


CROSSFIT

Comparison Study


A comparison of three conditioning trends and their results on recruit fitness. Study conducted at:

Northeast Florida Criminal Justice and Training Center

 

Fitness and Conditioning Review

Terrenyce J. Cooper -Sergeant- Jacksonville Sheriffs Office

Dates of Study:

September 01 - December 01, 2003

 this review was conducted ---caveat

In September 2003, three recruit programs began training at the Northeast Florida Criminal Justice and Training Center / Jacksonville Sheriffs Office Police Academy.  (Hereinafter known as the Academy)  The academy is tasked with the training of recruits who desire to pursue a career in law-enforcement.  During their training all recruits are required to participate in physical conditioning as a preparatory stage prior to the defensive tactics track.  The guidelines only allow for 28 hours of scheduled exercise time.  This requires the recruit to train on their own at the beginning or the end of the day.  Because the task of conditioning is a required course and recruits must pass an exit exam to graduate, training of recruits were divided and scheduled to train two days per week for one hour per day.  A total of seventy –eight recruits were assigned to the academy.  This study divided the groups into three classes.   Class one was a traditional exercise program not led by the writer, but results were submitted for charting.   A second modified program based on the third model, Crossfit.  Programs two and three were led by the writer.   The study charted the groups through three, two-part fitness exams conducted every 30 days.  The two part test consisted of one known task and one hopper or random task.   The results showed that the Crossfit model scored higher in all areas when compared to the two other models. Further, none of the Crossfit participants were unable to complete a random task.  The scoring criterion were weight to work ability, workout times with tasks to completion monthly test phases, and injury reduction.  All information in this review is specific to physical training.              

 

 

Implementation process

Applicants for the Basic Law Enforcement (BLE) programs are selected by having each participant undergo a four part exam that includes the Push-Up, Sit-Up, Sit and Reach, 1.5 mile travel, and Obstacle Course.  Participants that pass this process at the 70% performance are accepted into the academy for training.

The initial month of training was structured to account for a re-assessment of physical needs due to the “lay-off period’ between application process and initial training day.  The three groups (identified as A, B, C) were offered the pretest physical again to evaluate their fitness levels.  Groups A and B took the test, Group C did not.  Group A, B and C were weighed and given two basic health screens that consisted of weighing and a review of health habits.  Group A and B were requested to submit a review of rest and eating cycles for three days. This was followed by a review of health habits.  Five members were selected to participate in the Crossfit program.  The five were chosen across multiple gender, age and body types.  Group C was a blind test group and directed to participate as the training typically functions during the training cycle.   In review, 

Group A -Crossfit protocol of mixed modalities. Training was progressive in that it began as two days a week and graduated to a five days on two days off.  20-30 minutes maximum workouts.  2.5 hours total

Group B – Phase Training protocol progressive higher intensity. The training was conducted two to four days a week. 4 hours total  

Group C – Traditional weight training – aerobic Cycle training. Training was scheduled five days a week, one hour per day. 5 hours total.    At the end of  the third phase all participants were released from supervised training and encouraged to continue training using the methods they were introduced to.  Each training process will be reviewed later. 




Exercise Procedures

Group A - followed the Crossfit warm-up of Sampson stretch, Squat stretch and the routine of the day using reps needed to warm-up.

The Crossfit group training program is divided into two phases; phase one uses the works the participant at 70-90 percent efficiency in order to introduce each exercise and identify health problems of the participant during training.  Phase two promotes higher levels of performance while introducing the methods of charting along with nutrition and health keys. (This area is amplified by lectures and seminars)  Phase Three places the participant on the standard workout schedules depending on individual preference.

Program B

Group B – Group B used a standard routine of warm-up that included shoulder rotations; Leg raises (ballistic) Trunk twists, Sampson stretch and Squat stretch Forward and Sitting leans ( Squat and Sampson) this was considered the warm-up.  

This Group used a review process of exercises that targeted two areas; injury reduction and anticipated duty activity.  This group used three portions in a process that introduced an active warm-up portion, followed by non-weighted exercise portion and concluded with a 1-1/2 mile run.  The training is divided into three phases. Each phase increased the anaerobic/aerobic requirement of the participant with an increase in load after each test phase. At the end of phase three, Olympic lifting methods are introduced.  Phase three also introduces the participant personal training cues.

 Group B requires more detailed discussion as it is a modified Crossfit program. It  used an active warm up process followed by the general techniques used throughout the training program.  These techniques are related to total body conditioning as it relates to function. The primary exercises used cross the three modes of muscular response and specifically prepare the participant for performance. 

Group C used a traditional warm up sessions of slow stretching and partner stretching prior to warm-ups; this was followed by calisthenics and running or the prescribed workout of the day (weight training etc.)

The general procedure for this group began with a warm-up session. followed by periodized weight lifting or a run of ½ to 1-½  miles depending on the participants conditioning. The period after the warm up session was split according to the days of the week using the “every other day” method of weight training or running process.   The weight training was general upper body, lower body divisions.  (Arms, Legs, Back, and Chest) exercises include Arm Curls, Leg Presses, Bench Press, Treadmills etc.  Jumping Jacks, Sit-ups and Push-ups were also included in the program.  Stretching was very generic and modeled on the slow  warm-up method of movement.  There was no division of training phases in this group. The participants increased weights and distance as they developed over the time period.   

 

  

 

Chapter 3

test phases

Standard Test

A battery of exams they were aware of and scored individually.  Each effort was scored for time and effort.    

Standard Test Components

The recruits were given one minute to perform their best effort in the execution of:

Known Event 1: Push-Ups


Known Event 2:  Sit-Ups.



Known Event 3:  A timed run over 1-½ miles



Known Event 4:  A timed effort over the obstacle course.

Unknown Test 1:  A timed effort over 1 mile: Sub 7:30 mile

Unknown Test 2:  A timed effort over the obstacle course with load : Inman 300 yards with 45lbs

Unknown Test 3:  A group timed effort over the obstacle course with load named; 300 yard Inman relay as described above with each member completing five laps, 1 lap laden with weight. In the order assigned. No assistance allowed on each laden potion. Total distance is 1500 yards. The next runner to carry the weight must sprint ahead and stand by at the exchange point while all other members must run with the carrier

Unknown Test 4:  Three Rounds of the standard Phase Two workout for time and effort, minimum repetitions per round being the effort.

 


Flexibility in the hamstring and lower back. – This section was to evaluate stretching in the lower back and hamstrings under three “stretching methods “ 


 

Data collection / scoring

Scoring is tabulated every 30 days. The results posted here are from month three.  They take the results of group A, Five Crossfit Trainees, Group B Five modified trainees, and Group C five standard conditioning trainees.   The results speak for themselves.

Known Event 1:  Push-Ups

Known Event 2:  Sit-Ups. 

Known Event 3:  A timed run over 1-½  miles

Known Event 4:  A timed effort over the obstacle course.

Unknown test 1:  A timed effort over 1 mile: Sub 7:30 mile 

Unknown Test 2:  A timed effort over the obstacle course with load : Inman 300 yards with 45lbs.

Unknown Test 3:  A group timed effort over the obstacle course with load named; 300 yard Inman relay as described above with each member completing five laps, 1 lap laden with weight. In the order assigned. No assistance allowed on each laden potion. Total distance is 1500 yards. The next runner to carry the weight must sprint ahead and stand by at the exchange point while all other members must run with the carrier

Unknown Test 4:  Three Rounds of the standard Phase Two workout for time and effort, minimum repetitions per round being the effort.

Additional Strength Test:  Pull-Ups

 

Flexibility in the hamstring and lower back. – This section was to evaluate stretching in the lower back and hamstrings under three "stretching methods"  The purpose of this part of the program was to determine if a degree of flexibility was achieved using a post warm-up program vs. a concentrated stretching program.

Friday, January 3, 2014

Brain Change



T
he photo below depicts a deadlift.  Years ago it was called the lifelift.   Much like the twist in thinking that caused the redefinition then, Crossfit is making the challenge now.  Take the information given here and become the authority in developing your super-wellness.  You have the seeds of a process that, if planted, will grow beyond anything you have attempted until now. Your health on a full spectrum will be better defined and more on a scale that will fit your life as it goes through every stage.  Those stages could include injury recovery, athletic events, and general life needs.  So lets close the book and begin again.

Thursday, January 2, 2014

Results


M

 aking it work

 

Making it work also requires a good understanding of exercise as art. Understanding what exercises work well together as a group can be as important as knowing which ones to perform as individual efforts.  This knowledge allows you to see how to structure lectures, model mechanics, build contests, and restrict minimal efforts within a group.   For example, the beauty and simplicity of a push up, and an open air squat make it a staple for one person or 100.  Tweak them just a touch and you have tabata capability. Go a little further and the possibility of a controlled slow count pushups and jump-ups come to life.  If you are feeling bold, toss them together and the burpee is created.  Form becomes fitness becomes art.  The possibilities are endless.  Exercises such as Push up and Situps ( with their variants ) are always good group tools. Hollow rocks,  L-Sits, Squats, Knees-to-elbows ( ground versions ) are also good gymnastic routines for groups.  Deadlifts, Squats, and Benches are examples of events that are timely and remove the structure from a program. They in turn need to find alternate program positions.  Other exercises in this category could include Handstand Pushups, or Wipers.   Sporting challenges such as Hover tosses and of course hover ball are great day three events.   The trainer must stay challenged and focused on the purpose of each series or losing the class will fall squarely on them.  

 

Wednesday, January 1, 2014

Caveat


These are of course traditional weeks with split training days.  There would be no problem with using the routines on consecutive days of two, three or five day cycles.  Routines can maintain a fixed event day such as running every Monday or be varied to suit the skills of the participants.  In fact, in academy settings, the tiered process allows for a buildup of excitement, challenge by change and production with greater effort. By introducing the workouts via mechanics,  reduced loads, Rep and sets, The active participant can only grow into a fully developed effort that will push them beyond the former views of fitness.  

1.      Within the day group station rotation  ( medium groups ) 

Of course the efforts we discussed above can be micro compartmentalized and completed every day simply by using multiple workouts under the descriptions above.  By dividing a standard workout area into stations, the same Monday ,Wednesday, Friday or Tuesday ,Thursday efforts are achieved.  

Tuesday, December 31, 2013

Programming Sample II


 Three Day Week

Maintaining the groups as discussed, another variant could be as described below, with an emphasis on the first principle of each day’s list.   

Monday – M,  ( Run all groups )

Wednesday – W, G

Friday – G, W  

·                           

Monday – W (Split Series Weight emphasis)

Wednesday – G, M

Friday – M, G

·                           

Monday – G (Group routines)

Wednesday – M, W

Friday – W, M

·                           

Monday – Bench Mark

Wednesday – Lecture / Mechanics

Friday – Contest Day

Monday, December 30, 2013

Programming Sample I


Two Day Week 

 Tuesday: Group 1- Gymnastics, Group 2 – Met Con

Thursday: Group 2 – Gymnastics, Group 1 - Met Con

·          

Tuesday: Group 1 - Weightlifting barbell series, Group 2 - Dumbbell Series.

Thursday: Group 2 - Dumbbell Series, Group 1 - Weightlifting Series

 

 

Tuesday: Group 1 and 2 – Met Con, “Contest”, etc

Thursday: Group 1 and 2 – Lecture and Demonstration 

Sunday, December 29, 2013

Simply beautiful movement

 
Can you see the connections ?  The pelvis and spine stay together ! Functional movements generally wed the spine to the pelvis.  The SI joint and spine were designed for small range movement in multiple directions. Endeavor to keep the trunk tight and solid for running, jumping, squatting, throwing, cycling, etc.